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World News
Simon

One of the world's leading investigators into the illegal trade in ivory and rhino horn has been killed in Kenya

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Simon

Esmond Bradley Martin: Ivory investigator killed in Kenya

One of the world's leading investigators of the illegal trade in ivory and rhino horn has been killed in Kenya.

Quote

Esmond Bradley Martin, 75, was found in his Nairobi home on Sunday with a stab wound to his neck.

The former UN special envoy for rhino conservation was known for his undercover work investigating the black market.

The US citizen had recently returned from a research trip to Myanmar.

Bradley Martin was in the process of writing up his findings when he died, reports the BBC's Alastair Leithead from Nairobi.

His wife found him in their house in Langata. Police are investigating the circumstances but suspect it was a botched robbery.

 

Read more here: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-42943503

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Sanjo

Somehow I doubt it was a " botched robbery" which the police are currently suspecting it to be.

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ion

I think the traders behind that.  The illegal traders might be the responsible for that crime.  Ivory from rhinos is a big business in kenya, and for them, they don't need someone like the investigator for that illegal business.

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Simon

I don't know, it could be a robbery gone wrong. But the fact is that being an environmental defender or activist - for indigenous humans, wildlife, our climate, or natural resources - is really dangerous in many parts of the world. In 2017, almost four environmental defenders were killed every week:

Quote

The slaughter of people defending their land or environment continued unabated in 2017, with new research showing almost four people a week were killed worldwide in struggles against mines, plantations, poachers and infrastructure projects.

The toll of 197 in 2017 – which has risen fourfold since it was first compiled in 2002 – underscores the violence on the frontiers of a global economy driven by expansion and consumption.

And often the murders are never resolved and the ones responsible will go unpunished without having to face any kind of justice. It really is sickening.

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daggy24

http://www.latimes.com/world/africa/la-fg-kenya-conservationist-killed-20180205-story.html

 

Some of his friends in this article are also speculating this was a hit, staged as a robbery. Anything is possible but I think this man had way too much name recognition for this to be a robbery gone wrong, and also at the age of 75 what real threat did he pose to the invaders? I hate to say it, but with these tactics poachers and traders are achieving their goals. Destroy the enemy and create enough fear that the next generation will refuse to get involved on the ground due to the very real risks.

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Simon

Thanks for sharing that article with us @daggy24. It's still too early to speculate, but I would imagine that the economic interests in preserving the illegal wildlife trade would have much to gain from his death. And making it look like botched robbery would certainly help them get away with it.

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